Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Measuring Snow

Snow is a major topic in Star Valley.  How much fell, how deep it it, what is the water content etc?  It is not a trivial matter to answer all these questions.  Jim Steenburgh  in his blog provides a very good discussion of the difficulties in keeping track of snow. 

Measuring Snow Is Hard!

All observations are bad, but some are useful
- Paraphrased version of George Box quote
There is a tendency in meteorology to treat observations, especially those that are collected in place by weather stations, as ground truth.  Meteorology is a data starved field, which contributes to the tendency to place great value on any observations, but of course observations are not perfect and one needs to consider the possibility of error.  
There are two major sources of error in meteorological observations.  The first is observational error, which is the difference between what is measured and the true value.  Such errors can by systematic, meaning that they occur regularly, or random, which means they vary from observation to observation. A good example of a systematic error is the tendency for thermometers that are not well ventilated to overheat and record a higher temperature than that in the free air when they are in the sun on days with light winds.  A good example of a random error is that related to round off.  For example, many observations are recorded the nearest whole degree (fahrenheit or celcius) rather than with absolute precision, and this introduces some error to every observation.  
The second is representativeness error, which arises from the observation simply not being representative of the area or location to which it is being applied.  For example, we often use the temperature at the Salt Lake City airport as indicative of the temperature throughout the Salt Lake Metropolitan area.  While easy and convenient, this observation often times departs dramatically from temperatures in other parts the metro area, especially during inversions.   
Yesterday provided a good example of how both observational and representativeness errors can complicate the interpretation of snow observations.  These observations are collected by automated stations similar to the one below, which is our Alta-Atwater site (click to enlarge).  There is an ultrasonic snow depth sensor that measures snow depth from a stick mounted over a white board in the lower left of the photo.  Typically such boards are wiped and repositioned either following storms or at regular intervals of no frequently than every 6 hours.  The white cylinder on the platform is a precip gauge that measures snow-water equivalent.  
Here are automated snow amount, water equivalent, and water content observations from four locations in Little Cottonwood Canyon from midnight to 10 am.  These observations are based on ultrasonic snow depth sensors, which measures snow depth on a white board, and precipitation gauges that measure snow water equivalent.  
Alta-Collins (~9700 ft): 6 inches, .23" SWE, 3.8%
Alta-Atwater (~8800 ft): 8.4 inches, .18" SWE, 2.1%
Alta Guard (~8800 ft): 5.9 inches, .31" SWE, 5.2%
Elberts (~7600 ft): 3.15 inches, .09" SWE, 2.9% 
What is to be believed?  The Alta-Atwater and Alta Guard sites are within a couple hundred yards of each other, yet Alta-Atwater has more snow, less SWE, and lower water content.
There are many factors that contribute to the variability seen above.  One is that there were real variations in snowfall that contribute to some of the differences between the two sites.  Two is that the snow depth and precip measurements are essentially point measurements.  We had very low density snow yesterday and even with a small amount of wind can transport snow.  Thus a single measurement might not be representative of the snowfall in the area around the observing site.  Think about how flow around the platform and other obstacles might affect what is measured by the instruments at the Alta-Atwater site.  The effects are probably not large, but they aren't zero.  
Third, the snow-depth measurements aren't fully consistent.  The snow masurement at Alta-Atwater is based on a difference in measured snowdepth at two times with no wiping of the board during the recording period.  The snow measurement at Alta Guard is based on the addition of two measurements taken before and after a wiping of the board.  Each operating group has different approaches and times that they do this.  
Fourth, most precipitation gauges are prone to undercatch, meaning that flow across the gauge prevents all the snow from falling into it and being recorded.  The winds were not strong yesterday, but the snow density was very low, and low density snow is very prone to undercatch.  Some of the variations in SWE probably reflect variations in undercatch.  For example, we have noticed that our site at Alta-Atwater is very prone to undercatch, probably because it is mounted a few meters above the ground, and this might explain the anomalously low SWE and water content at the site.  
Fifth, low-sensity snow can be a poor reflector of sound, and this can lead to measurement errors by the ultrasonic snow depth sensor. 
I can add a few more, but I think you get the point.  There are lots of potential error sources and this complicated the interpretation of automated snow measurements yesterday.  For this reason, snow geeks typically supplement automated measurements with those taken manually. 
Yup, 250 years after the industrial revolution, and the old fashioned way is still the best way to measure snow.  Of course, manual observations have the disadvantage of not being on demand and all the time. 

Sunday, February 24, 2013

Snow Summary

The recent storm has moved out of Western Wyoming leaving clear skies across the region,

Following is the statement issued by the Riverton  Forecast Office listing the snow reports from Western Wyoming.


NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RIVERTON WY
205 PM MST SUN FEB 24 2013

...THE CENTER OF A STRONG WINTER STORM WAS CIRCULATING NEAR THE FOUR
CORNERS AREA EARLY THIS AFTERNOON. BELOW ARE SNOWFALL AMOUNTS THAT
OCCURRED ACROSS WESTERN AND CENTRAL WYOMING FROM THIS SYSTEM AS OF 2
PM...

LOCATION                             SNOWFALL

BIG HORN COUNTY...
 26 E LOVELL...                       8 INCHES.
 BONE SPRINGS DIVIDE SNOTEL...        4 INCHES.
 BALD MOUNTAIN SNOTEL...              2 INCHES.
 SHELL CREEK SNOTEL...                1 INCH.

FREMONT COUNTY...
 6 SE LANDER...                      12 INCHES.
 HOBBS PARK SNOTEL...                11 INCHES.
 6.6 SW LANDER...                    10 INCHES.
 SWEETWATER STATION...                9 INCHES.
 ST. LAWRENCE ALT SNOTEL...           9 INCHES.
 TOWNSEND CREEK SNOTEL...             8 INCHES.
 9.5 SW LANDER...                     8 INCHES.
 9 SSE LANDER...                    7.5 INCHES.
 9 S LANDER...                        7 INCHES.
 LANDER AIRPORT...                  6.6 INCHES.
 COLD SPRINGS SNOTEL...               6 INCHES.
 HUDSON...                            6 INCHES.
 DEER PARK SNOTEL...                  5 INCHES.
 3 SW LANDER...                       5 INCHES.
 BROOKS LAKE LODGE...               4.1 INCHES.
 1 WSW LANDER...                    4.1 INCHES.
 SOUTH PASS SNOTEL...                 4 INCHES.
 LANDER...                            3 INCHES.
 JEFFREY CITY...                      2 INCHES.
 CASTLE CREEK SNOTEL...               2 INCHES.
 LITTLE WARM SNOTEL...                2 INCHES.
 RIVERTON ASOS...                   1.2 INCHES.
 RIVERTON...                          1 INCH.
 BURROUGHS CREEK SNOTEL...            1 INCH.

HOT SPRINGS COUNTY...
 1 SW THERMOPOLIS...                  3 INCHES.
 OWL CREEK SNOTEL...                  3 INCHES.
 THERMOPOLIS...                     2.5 INCHES.
 9 NE THERMOPOLIS...                1.5 INCHES.
 KIRBY...                           1.5 INCHES.
 8 W THERMOPOLIS...                   1 INCH.

JOHNSON COUNTY...
 LITTLE GOOSE SNOTEL...               5 INCHES.
 CLOUD PEAK RESERVOIR SNOTEL...       4 INCHES.
 BEAR TRAP MEADOW SNOTEL...           3 INCHES.
 HANSEN SAWMILL SNOTEL...             2 INCHES.
 SOLDIER PARK SNOTEL...               2 INCHES.

LINCOLN COUNTY...
 COMMISSARY RIDGE...                 10 INCHES.
 ALPINE...                            8 INCHES.
 BLIND BULL SUMMIT...                 6 INCHES.
 WILLOW CREEK SNOTEL...               6 INCHES.
 5 SSE SMOOT...                       6 INCHES.
 2 SE THAYNE...                     5.2 INCHES.
 BLIND BULL SUMMIT SNOTEL...          5 INCHES.
 SPRING CREEK DIVIDE SNOTEL...        4 INCHES.
 COTTONWOOD CREEK SNOTEL...           4 INCHES.
 INDIAN CREEK SNOTEL...               4 INCHES.
 BOX Y RANCH...                       3 INCHES.
 HAMS FORK SNOTEL...                  3 INCHES.
 KELLEY RANGER STATION SNOTEL...      3 INCHES.
 1 E THAYNE...                        3 INCHES.
 KEMMERER...                        2.5 INCHES.
 SALT RIVER SUMMIT SNOTEL...          2 INCHES.
 FOSSIL BUTTE...                    1.2 INCHES.

NATRONA COUNTY...
 CASPER MOUNTAIN...                  36 INCHES.
 CASPER MOUNTAIN...                  36 INCHES.
 CASPER MOUNTAIN...                  30 INCHES.
 CASPER MOUNTAIN SNOTEL...           23 INCHES.
 CASPER MOUNTAIN...                  22 INCHES.
 CASPER MOUNTAIN...                  13 INCHES.
 7 S CASPER...                     11.5 INCHES.
 RENO HILL SNOTEL...                  9 INCHES.
 2 NNE ALCOVA...                      8 INCHES.
 CASPER...                            6 INCHES.
  10 WSW CASPER...                    5 INCHES.
 4 WSW CASPER...                    4.8 INCHES.
 4 WSW CASPER...                    4.8 INCHES.
 2 S CASPER...                        4 INCHES.
 2 S CASPER...                      3.7 INCHES.
 CASPER AIRPORT...                  2.2 INCHES.
 3 NNE CASPER...                      2 INCHES.
 GRAVE SPRING SNOTEL...               1 INCH.

PARK COUNTY...
 EVENING STAR SNOTEL...               5 INCHES.
 BEARTOOTH LAKE SNOTEL...             5 INCHES.
 WOLVERINE SNOTEL...                  3 INCHES.
 TIMBER CREEK SNOTEL...               3 INCHES.
 BLACKWATER SNOTEL...                 3 INCHES.
 MARQUETTE SNOTEL...                  2 INCHES.
 PAHASKA...                           1 INCH.
 2 WSW CODY...                        1 INCH.

SUBLETTE COUNTY...
 14 NW PINEDALE...                  2.1 INCHES.
 TRIPLE PEAK SNOTEL...                2 INCHES.
 EAST RIM DIVIDE SNOTEL...            2 INCHES.
 DANIEL FISH HATCHERY...            0.4 INCHES.

SWEETWATER COUNTY...
 1 S ROCK SPRINGS...                4.8 INCHES.
 1 W ROCK SPRINGS...                4.3 INCHES.
 WAMSUTTER...                         4 INCHES.
 ROCK SPRINGS...                      4 INCHES.
 1 E ROCK SPRINGS...                3.4 INCHES.
 GREEN RIVER...                       3 INCHES.
 GREEN RIVER...                     2.5 INCHES.
 7 SSE ROCK SPRINGS...              0.6 INCHES.

TETON COUNTY...
 JACKSON HOLE-RAYMER...              16 INCHES.
 JACKSON HOLE-RENDEZVOUS BOWL...     16 INCHES.
 GRAND TARGHEE SNOTEL...             15 INCHES.
 GRAND TARGHEE-CHIEF JOSEPH...       13 INCHES.
 JACKSON HOLE-MID...                 12 INCHES.
 GRASSY LAKE SNOTEL...               10 INCHES.
 PHILLIPS BENCH SNOTEL...             6 INCHES.
 BASE CAMP SNOTEL...                  5 INCHES.
 TOGWOTEE PASS SNOTEL...              5 INCHES.
 GRANITE CREEK SNOTEL...              5 INCHES.
 TOGWOTEE MOUNTAIN LODGE...           5 INCHES.
 MOOSE...                           4.8 INCHES.
 SNAKE RIVER STN SNOTEL...            4 INCHES.
 MOOSE...                             4 INCHES.
 GROS VENTRE SUMMIT SNOTEL...         3 INCHES.
 SNOW KING SKI AREA...                3 INCHES.
 JACKSON HOLE-BASE...                 3 INCHES.
 5 WNW MORAN...                       3 INCHES.
 5 NW JACKSON...                    2.5 INCHES.
 2 NE TETON VILLAGE...                2 INCHES.
 JACKSON...                           2 INCHES.

WASHAKIE COUNTY...
 27 S TEN SLEEP...                  3.1 INCHES.
 16 SSE TEN SLEEP...                  2 INCHES.
 POWDER RIVER PASS SNOTEL...          2 INCHES.
 MIDDLE POWDER SNOTEL...              2 INCHES.
 5 NNW TEN SLEEP...                 1.1 INCHES.

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK...
 LEWIS LAKE DIVIDE SNOTEL...          8 INCHES.
 TWO OCEAN PLATEAU SNOTEL...          6 INCHES.
 CANYON SNOTEL...                     5 INCHES.
 PARKER PEAK SNOTEL...                4 INCHES.
 THUMB DIVIDE SNOTEL...               4 INCHES.
 SYLVAN LAKE SNOTEL...                3 INCHES.
 SYLVAN ROAD SNOTEL...                2 INCHES.
 OLD FAITHFUL RANGER STATION...       2 INCHES.
 LAMAR RANGER STATION...              1 INCH.
 YELLOWSTONE EAST ENTRANCE...       0.5 INCHES.

Friday, February 22, 2013

Snowy Weekend Ahead

Snow spread across Star  Valley this Friday morning, and will be persisting through the weekend.  Riverton Forecast Office in their weekly video presentation provides an excellent discussion what is ahead.

http://www.crh.noaa.gov/riw/?n=weatherbriefing

The precipitation forecast for the next 3 days through Monday morning shows water content of the snow that falls will range upwards to close to an inch over the Western Wyoming mountains.

Total precipitation Friday morning to Monday morning.

Given a snow/rain ratio of 15-20 to 1,  total new snow would range from 1-2 feet in the mountains and possibly a foot in the nearby valleys, including Star Valley.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Spring Snowmelt Forecast

The most recent Spring Snowmelt Forecast was issued on Feb 20, 2012  Given normal precipitation the remainder of the snow season, Star Valley  area, including  the Salt and Grey Rivers will experience below normal runoff, but still better than much of the remainder of Wyoming.

February 2013 Wyoming Spring Snowmelt Flood Potential Outlook---issued February 20th

Quick Synopsis:

Mountain snowpack and associated snow water equivalents (SWEs) across Wyoming continued to be generally below average by the middle of February.  SWEs at the peak snowmelt runoff elevations (8,000’ – 9.500’) were the highest across northern Wyoming at 95 – 105 percent of normal; while across southeastern Wyoming, SWEs were 65 to 75 percent of average at the peak snowmelt runoff elevations.

This outlook is based on various diverse hydrological factors such as snow water equivalents (SWEs) in the mountain snowpack, basin morphology, extent of burn scars from 2012 fires, amount of bark beetle kill, and



HIGHLIGHTS:


 …The majority of headwater basins across Wyoming can expect a generally low potential for flooding due to springtime snowmelt...



The next graphical outlook will be issued around the 23rd of March. 

 

The current Wyoming Spring 2013 Snowmelt Runoff Flood Potential Outlook graphic:

 


  
 *****************************************************************************************
Other hydrological information for Wyoming can be found at the NOAA hydrology website: 
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/riw/?n=snowpack

Monthly Wyoming Hydrologic Summary and Graphics:
(updated monthly around the 15th of every month)

Wyoming Drought Information Page:
(updated at least once a month)


Wyoming Graphical Water Supply Outlook:
(updated by the 15th of every month—January-June)

Wyoming Average Precipitation by Basin:
 (updated monthly)

Wyoming Spring Snowmelt Runoff Flood Potential Graphic:
(updated by the 25th of the month---January-May)
Current and Forecast Wyoming Streamflows and/or River Stages:


*******************************************************************************



Sunday, February 17, 2013

Still Winter

Although temperatures warmed to well above freezing in all of Star Valley Saturday afternoon with the 47 at Star Valley Ranch leading the way, winter is not over.  A series of storm systems will have a major impact on the western states over the next 6-10 days.  The first storm is just grazing the Star Valley area  with most of the effects occurring to the north.  While mainly flurries have been observed in the Valley so far with this system, the highway web cam located 4 miles east of Victor ID heading toward Teton Pass was experiencing winter driving conditions this Sunday Morning.

Web Cam  view 4 miles east of Victor ID
The infra-red satellite photo coupled with the 500 MB analysis not only depicts the system now moving across the Northern  and Central Rockies, but the even stronger trough over the Gulf Of Alaska.
Infra-red image and 500 MB analysis Sunday AM

This trough will take a much further south route as it develops  into the Southwestern States.

Following are a series of 500mb forecast maps through this coming week, graphically depicting this return to a winter time weather pattern over the entire western U.S.

Sunday AM
Monday AM
Tuesday AM
Wednesday AM
Thursday AM
While this pattern change assures that cold temperatures will return to Star Valley along with some snow, there is still considerable uncertainty as to how much snow will fall over the coming week.

The model forecast precipitation is inconclusive for the period ending Thursday morning.  Much of the west will experience at least some rain/snow, but the southern storm track suggests the heaviest amounts should be to the south and east of Star Valley.

Precipitation total ending Thursday morning 02/21/2013

Following are the meteograms for Star Valley through the coming work week.

 While snow is expected again by Wednesday and Thursday, amounts are not large.  However temperatures will struggle to reach freezing through the week.

Looking further down the road this 6-10 day outlook extending into the middle of the last week of February suggests continued below normal temperatures with about average precipitation.


Thursday, February 14, 2013

Weekly Weather Briefing

Riverton Forecast Office has issued their weekly weather briefing.  They highlight the potential for a significant winter storm by the middle of next week.

http://www.crh.noaa.gov/riw/?n=weatherbriefing

Some Snow, Sun through Weekend

Currently Wyoming, including Star Valley,  is in a northwesterly flow on the east side of a high pressure ridge off the West Coast. Pacific moisture is riding over the top of the ridge and resulting in periods of mostly light snow and cloudiness across Star Valley and surrounding areas.  Following is a water vapor video for the 24 hour period ending Thursday morning.

video
A weak impulse withing the northwesterly which shows up now east of Star Valley on the video resulted in an about an inch of snow overnight. 

Following is a sequence of 500 mb charts  showing the progression of the high pressure ridge inland this weekend followed by a trough of low pressure.

Thursday morning
Friday morning
Saturday morning

Sunday morning


Another period of mostly light snow will spread across the area by tonight, however some clearing is likely on Friday into Saturday as the ridge moves inland.

Following are meteograms  reflecting the forecast for Star Valley through the coming weekend.


 Temperatures should remain below freezing during daylight hours, however the cloud cover should preclude the below zero nights experienced  earlier this week.

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Wyoming Water Supply Outlook-February 11 2012

The most recent water supply outlook indicates all of Wyoming is headed for a below normal runoff.  In Star Valley, the Salt River, while below normal, is in much better condition than much of the southern and eastern portions of the state. Let us hope for a wet Spring!


Wyoming Water Supply Outlook---issued February 11, 2013

...January basin precipitation was 80 to 85 percent of average across Wyoming…
…Mountain snowpack across Wyoming continues to be 80 to 85 percent of average... 
..Well below normal streamflow volumes expected across much of southern Wyoming watersheds...
…Wyoming reservoir storages continue to be near average for early February…
January precipitation across Wyoming was 80 to 85 percent of average. Precipitation numbers varied between 142 percent of normal over the Tongue Basin to 43 percent of normal over the Laramie Drainage.
Mountain snowpack across Wyoming continued to be 80 to 85 percent of normal by early February.  Snowpack "water" numbers and/or SWEs were the highest across western Wyoming—varying between 90 to 105 percent of normal.  SWEs were the lowest across southeastern Wyoming---varying from 35 to 65 percent of normal.
Near normal snowmelt streamflow volumes are expected across major basins across northwestern Wyoming---which includes the Upper Yellowstone, the Snake, and the Shoshone Watersheds.  Near normal (90 to 99 percent) streamflow volumes are also expected across the Upper Wind River Basin.
Well below normal (50 to 75 percent) spring snowmelt volumes are expected for a majority of watersheds across southern Wyoming.
Reservoirs storages across Wyoming are near average for early February.
The latest Wyoming water supply outlook graphic:

Monday, February 11, 2013

Snowfall Totals Feb 8-10

The following is a summary of snowfall total  from the recent storm.  Star Valley as expected was on the northern portion of the heaviest snows.

Total Snowfall February 8-10
County Station Name Snowfall
Big Horn Bone Springs Divide Snotel 4
Big Horn 26 E Lovell 2.5
Big Horn Shell Creek Snotel 1
Big Horn Bald Mountain Snotel 1
Fremont 3 SW Lander 20.6
Fremont 9 SSE Lander 17.1
Fremont 3 SW Lander 16.5
Fremont 5 WSW Lander 16
Fremont Lander Airport 15.7
Fremont 4 SSW Lander 13.2
Fremont Lander 13
Fremont 6 SE Lander 12.5
Fremont 4 WSW Lander 12
Fremont 1 W Lander 12
Fremont 1 WSW Lander 11.5
Fremont Riverton 10.5
Fremont Townsend Creek Snotel 10
Fremont Hobbs Park Snotel 8
Fremont Jeffrey City 8
Fremont 2 E Sweetwater Station 8
Fremont St. Lawrence Alt Snotel 8
Fremont Lander 7.2
Fremont South Pass Snotel 7
Fremont Hudson 7
Fremont Deer Park Snotel 7
Fremont 2 NE Kinnear 7
Fremont Riverton ASOS 6.9
Fremont Riverton 6.8
Fremont Cold Springs Snotel 6
Fremont 2 W Riverton 6
Fremont Dubois 6
Fremont 1 E Morton 5.5
Fremont Dubois 5.5
Fremont Little Warm Snotel 5
Fremont 1 S Riverton 5
Fremont 2 W Riverton 3.8
Fremont 10 NNE Riverton 3.3
Fremont Burroughs Creek Snotel 3
Fremont Brooks Lake Lodge 2.1
Fremont Castle Creek Snotel 1
Fremont Burris 0.5
Hot Springs 1 SW Thermopolis 5.5
Hot Springs 9 NE Thermopolis 5.1
Hot Springs Owl Creek Snotel 5
Hot Springs 1 SW Thermopolis 4
Hot Springs Thermopolis 3.5
Hot Springs 8 W Thermopolis 3.5
Johnson Cloud Peak Reservoir Snotel 6
Johnson Little Goose Snotel 5
Johnson Bear Trap Meadow Snotel 4
Johnson Soldier Park Snotel 4
Johnson Hansen Sawmill Snotel 3
Johnson Buffalo 1.5
Lincoln Smoot 15
Lincoln Spring Creek Divide Snotel 10
Lincoln Kemmerer 9
Lincoln Afton 8.4
Lincoln 5 SSE Smoot 8
Lincoln Turnerville 8
Lincoln Cokeville 8
Lincoln Box Y Ranch 8
Lincoln Fossil Butte 6.8
Lincoln Salt River Summit Snotel 6
Lincoln Kemmerer 6
Lincoln Indian Creek Snotel 6
Lincoln Commissary Ridge 5
Lincoln Hams Fork Snotel 5
Lincoln 2 SE Thayne 4.7
Lincoln 21 NNW Kemmerer 4
Lincoln Cottonwood Creek Snotel 4
Lincoln Blind Bull Summit 4
Lincoln Willow Creek Snotel 3
Lincoln Kelley Ranger Station Snotel 3
Lincoln Blind Bull Summit Snotel 3
Lincoln Thayne 2
Natrona Casper Mountain 16
Natrona Casper Mountain 14.5
Natrona Casper Mountain Snotel 12
Natrona Reno Hill Snotel 12
Natrona 2 S Casper 6
Natrona Bessemer Bend 5.5
Natrona 10 WSW Casper 5.5
Natrona 2 S Casper 5.5
Natrona 3 SW Casper 5.5
Natrona Paradise Valley 5.2
Natrona Casper Airport 5.1
Natrona 4 SW Casper 5.1
Natrona 4 WSW Casper 5
Natrona 11 ESE Casper 4.8
Natrona 3 NNE Casper 4
Natrona Grave Spring Snotel 4
Natrona Midwest 2
Park Marquette Snotel 6
Park Timber Creek Snotel 4
Park Kirwin Snotel 2
Park Blackwater Snotel 2
Park Evening Star Snotel 2
Park Pahaska 1
Park 2 WSW Cody 1
Park 5 ESE Cody 1
Park Wolverine Snotel 1
Park 1 WNW Cody 0.5
Sublette Triple Peak Snotel 11
Sublette Snider Basin Snotel 9
Sublette 14 NW Pinedale 5.8
Sublette Marbleton 5
Sublette Bondurant 4.1
Sublette New Fork Lake Snotel 4
Sublette Daniel Fish Hatchery 4
Sublette East Rim Divide Snotel 4
Sublette White Pine Ski Area 3.5
Sublette Loomis Park Snotel 3
Sublette Cora 2.1
Sublette Gunsite Pass Snotel 1
Sublette Elkhart Park G.S. Snotel 1
Sublette Kendall Ranger Station Snotel 1
Sublette Big Sandy Opening Snotel 1
Sublette Boulder Rearing Station 1
Sweetwater Wamsutter 8-9
Sweetwater 7 SSE Rock Springs 2.8
Sweetwater 1 W Rock Springs 2.6
Sweetwater 38 NW Superior 2.5
Sweetwater 1 S Rock Springs 2.2
Sweetwater 1 E Rock Springs 2.2
Sweetwater Buckboard Marina 1.5
Sweetwater Green River 1.1
Teton 3 SSW Wilson 3.2
Teton Jackson Hole-Raymer 3
Teton Jackson Hole-Rendezvous Bowl 3
Teton Grand Targhee-Chief Joseph 2.2
Teton Snake River Stn Snotel 2
Teton Darwin Ranch 2
Teton Granite Creek Snotel 1
Teton Togwotee Pass Snotel 1
Teton Snow King Ski Area 1
Teton Jackson 1
Teton 4 SSW Jackson 1
Teton Moose 0.5
Teton 2 NE Teton Village 0.3
Washakie 16 SSE Ten Sleep 6.5
Washakie Middle Powder Snotel 3
Washakie 27 S Ten Sleep 2
Washakie 5 NNW Ten Sleep 1.5
Washakie Powder River Pass Snotel